Category: Exercise

Sleep

Sleep.

sleeping L3W

Adequate sleep is a key part of a healthy lifestyle, and can benefit your heart, weight, mind, and more.

Sleep isn’t exactly a time when your body and brain shut off. While you rest, your brain stays busy, overseeing a wide variety of biological maintenance that keeps your body running in top condition, preparing you for the day ahead.

Your sleep schedule, bedtime habits, and day-to-day lifestyle choices can make an enormous difference to the quality of your nightly rest. Everyone should get a minimum of 8 hours of sleep. The first four hours are responsible for body recovery; the last four hours are responsible for mental recovery. You should eat at least 2 hours before sleep, the longer before bedtime, the better. If the person eats poorly for dinner or dessert, they will have sugar spikes and insulin surges, which will have the adrenal glands release cortisol through the night. The body will not get the restorative rest needed and you will wake up tired. The body will crave the caffeine and sugar first thing in the morning and then the whole process will start again.

Sleep is the biggest anti-inflammatory, that’s why the body feels more comfortable when is cooler in the room at night.

The health benefits of a good night’s sleep are: Memory and brain function improvement, more stamina and better performance, reduce stress and improve quality of life.

Some of the consequences of sleep deprivation can include: Decreased performance and alertness, memory and cognitive impairment, stress, occupational or automobile injury, heart disease, diabetes and psychiatric problems. It is also very hard to lose weight without restorative sleep.

The L3W program usually gets great results with sleep quality. It normally takes only 2-3 days to improve a patient’s sleep.

Exercise

Exercise and physical activity is the path to health and well-being.

exercisePatients can exercise 4-5 times per week. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday workout schedule is optimal. 1-1.5 hours of exercise is optimal.

Lose weight goal: keep the heart rate steady at a 60-65% of highest heart rate. Walking steady on a flat surface for 45-60 minutes straight is optimal. Try and keep the heart rate at 106-116 depending on age. Walk at 3.0-3.3 mph. Fat is the lowest source of energy, so with a low heart rate the body uses fat for energy. As the heart rate increases the body bypasses fat and uses muscle (glycogen) for energy. People think that excessive sweating is burning fat, but in reality sweating is the body cooling itself off and is water weight. The returns back to normal after eating and drinking.

Cardio goal: To strengthen the heart muscle and increase endurance the heart rate can get up to 70-80% of the heart rate. Try and do a 30 minute training session. Patients should only do hard cardio 3x per week maximum. Too much cardio exercise can cause adrenal fatigue. It is very common to get a flat line cortisol from excessive exercise. A flat line cortisol will cause insulin resistance, in which makes it very difficult to lose belly fat. The thyroid can be affected by excessive exercise, when the adrenal glands are stressed or not functioning optimally, the thyroid will not convert T4 into T3 properly (Thyroid Hormone). So the Master Gland (Thyroid) can be compromised, in which will affect the entire endocrine system. The excessive exercise can decrease Hormone production for males and females. Testosterone, progesterone, DHEA, and Estrogens are produced in the adrenal glands; the excessive exercise can decrease hormone production. Professional athletes have the tendency to have very low hormones when they reach the late 30’s and early 40’s. Excessive exercise can have a negative effect on the body!!!


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