Category: Cholesterol

Testosterone Levels

testosterone

Testosterone is a hormone that is produced by the body. In men, it is mostly produced in the testicles but is also produced in the adrenal glands. It is responsible for stimulating sperm production and sex drive, as well as building muscles and bone mass. As men age, its production decreases. When production drastically drops or ceases, a range of symptoms and complications can occur. Signs of low testosterone (low T) are often subtle and are mistaken as a natural part of aging. Decrease of focus, sex drive, strength, endurance, drive, belly fat and feeling less worth.

Testosterone therapy is good, but L3W feels the body needs to become optimal first to produce the most hormones before incorporating a low dose of either HCG or Testosterone as a daily regimen.

The body needs the proper food program for the individual to optimize the hormone level, and the organs and glands associated with Testosterone may need attention (Hypothalamus, Pituitary, Testicles, and Adrenal glands).

Cholesterol is the precursor to most of the body’s hormones which includes Testosterone. Low fat diets,  Statin drugs (cholesterol lowering medicines), and Insulin surges from unbalanced food programs will decrease the amount of Testosterone the body produces.

L3W recommends you eat for your biochemical type to reduce insulin surges, and increase your healthy fat in which should increase hormone production. Supplement the organs and glands that need attention to produce more hormones.

If your doctor prescribes you a testosterone replacement regimen, your body needs an Estrogen blocker to counter act the testosterone, and we recommend a low dose of HCG along with the Testosterone; the HCG stimulates the testicles to initiate natural testosterone production and stop testicle shrinkage.

Seek out an L3W provider to get your blood and saliva tested, if you are having any signs and symptoms of low T.

Testosterone1

Metabolic syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is a very common condition that has ramifications of high cardiovascular risk. The objective findings are:metabolic syndrome

  • Triglyceride level of 150 milligrams per deciliter of blood (mg/dL) or greater
  • HDL cholesterol of less than 40 mg/dL in men or less than 50 mg/dL in women
  • Systolic blood pressure (top number) of 130 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or greater
  • Diastolic blood pressure (bottom number) of 85 mm Hg or greater
  • Fasting glucose of 100 mg/dL or greater
  • Insulin resistance or glucose intolerance (the body can’t properly use insulin or blood sugar)

Having just one of these conditions doesn’t mean you have metabolic syndrome. However, any of these conditions increase your risk of serious disease. If more than one of these conditions occur in combination, your risk is even greater.

Metabolic syndrome is linked to your body’s metabolism, possibly to a condition called insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that helps control the amount of sugar in your bloodstream.

Normally, your digestive system breaks down the foods you eat into sugar (glucose). Your blood carries the glucose to your body’s tissues, where the cells use it as fuel. Glucose enters your cells with the help of insulin. In people with insulin resistance, cells don’t respond normally to insulin, and glucose can’t enter the cells as easily. As a result, glucose levels in your blood rise despite your body’s attempt to control the glucose by churning out more and more insulin. The result is higher than normal levels of insulin in your blood. This can eventually lead to diabetes when your body is unable to make enough insulin to keep the blood glucose within the normal range.

Even if your levels aren’t high enough to be considered diabetes, an elevated glucose level can still be harmful. In fact, some doctors refer to this condition as “prediabetes.” Increased insulin resistance raises your triglyceride level and other blood fat levels. It also interferes with how your kidneys work, leading to higher blood pressure. These combined effects of insulin resistance put you at risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and other conditions.

Although metabolic syndrome is a serious condition, you can reduce your risks significantly by eating the right combination foods for your biochemical type and increasing your physical activity.

The L3W program will guide you through a healthier lifestyle.

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About Your Work Out

Work Outweights

The purpose of working out is to provide training loads that are effective in improving performance, reduce fat, increase strength, muscle density and give a person a feeling of well being.

The most common mistake is working out too much. Believe it or not, over training and not eating enough will reduce results and performance. The person should eat the right combination of food for them (Biochemical Type) 2+ hours before their workout.  Muscle fibers get micro tears during the proper workout. Eating protein after the workout helps replenish and fuel the muscle. And the most important component is Rest. Rest repairs the muscle tissue and allows growth. Over training does not allow the rest and repair. So muscle development might be hindered without the proper amount of healing.

Intense exercise has cardiovascular rewards but it also stresses the system. The physiological effects are as follows:  Increased Cortisol, Dysglycemia, amino acid deficits, mineral deficits, immune stress (adrenal glands), can create catabolic metabolism, makes you prone to injury and can decrease metabolic efficiency.

New Cardio EquipmentWe are in favor of a moderate exercise regime, moderate workouts lower fat thermostat, improve sugar metabolism, increase fat burning enzymatic activity in muscle, improve oxygenation of tissue, increase bone density and muscle to fat ratio, reduce fluid retention and stress hormones.

Our recommendation is a 4 day workout regime (2 days on, 1 day off; then 2 days on, followed by 2 days off), which includes weight training. The weight training should alternate muscle groups per workout; (example:  Chest/triceps, biceps/legs, and shoulder/back). We advise an 8-12 repetition protocol to build muscle density (45-75mins) followed by 20 minute maximum cardio 2x your resting heart rate. This is a diabetic workout, but we feel this workout is best for everyone.

Sleep

Sleep.

sleeping L3W

Adequate sleep is a key part of a healthy lifestyle, and can benefit your heart, weight, mind, and more.

Sleep isn’t exactly a time when your body and brain shut off. While you rest, your brain stays busy, overseeing a wide variety of biological maintenance that keeps your body running in top condition, preparing you for the day ahead.

Your sleep schedule, bedtime habits, and day-to-day lifestyle choices can make an enormous difference to the quality of your nightly rest. Everyone should get a minimum of 8 hours of sleep. The first four hours are responsible for body recovery; the last four hours are responsible for mental recovery. You should eat at least 2 hours before sleep, the longer before bedtime, the better. If the person eats poorly for dinner or dessert, they will have sugar spikes and insulin surges, which will have the adrenal glands release cortisol through the night. The body will not get the restorative rest needed and you will wake up tired. The body will crave the caffeine and sugar first thing in the morning and then the whole process will start again.

Sleep is the biggest anti-inflammatory, that’s why the body feels more comfortable when is cooler in the room at night.

The health benefits of a good night’s sleep are: Memory and brain function improvement, more stamina and better performance, reduce stress and improve quality of life.

Some of the consequences of sleep deprivation can include: Decreased performance and alertness, memory and cognitive impairment, stress, occupational or automobile injury, heart disease, diabetes and psychiatric problems. It is also very hard to lose weight without restorative sleep.

The L3W program usually gets great results with sleep quality. It normally takes only 2-3 days to improve a patient’s sleep.

Exercise

Exercise and physical activity is the path to health and well-being.

exercisePatients can exercise 4-5 times per week. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday workout schedule is optimal. 1-1.5 hours of exercise is optimal.

Lose weight goal: keep the heart rate steady at a 60-65% of highest heart rate. Walking steady on a flat surface for 45-60 minutes straight is optimal. Try and keep the heart rate at 106-116 depending on age. Walk at 3.0-3.3 mph. Fat is the lowest source of energy, so with a low heart rate the body uses fat for energy. As the heart rate increases the body bypasses fat and uses muscle (glycogen) for energy. People think that excessive sweating is burning fat, but in reality sweating is the body cooling itself off and is water weight. The returns back to normal after eating and drinking.

Cardio goal: To strengthen the heart muscle and increase endurance the heart rate can get up to 70-80% of the heart rate. Try and do a 30 minute training session. Patients should only do hard cardio 3x per week maximum. Too much cardio exercise can cause adrenal fatigue. It is very common to get a flat line cortisol from excessive exercise. A flat line cortisol will cause insulin resistance, in which makes it very difficult to lose belly fat. The thyroid can be affected by excessive exercise, when the adrenal glands are stressed or not functioning optimally, the thyroid will not convert T4 into T3 properly (Thyroid Hormone). So the Master Gland (Thyroid) can be compromised, in which will affect the entire endocrine system. The excessive exercise can decrease Hormone production for males and females. Testosterone, progesterone, DHEA, and Estrogens are produced in the adrenal glands; the excessive exercise can decrease hormone production. Professional athletes have the tendency to have very low hormones when they reach the late 30’s and early 40’s. Excessive exercise can have a negative effect on the body!!!


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