Hypothyroidism

Thyroid Gland

Thyroid Gland

Hypothyroidism or low thyroid function can be caused by malfunction of another organ system.

Adrenal Fatigue is frequently overlooked and usually the most common cause of secondary low thyroid function, both clinically and sub-clinically. Low adrenal function often leads to low thyroid function. Low free T4, low free T3, high TSH, slow ankle reflex and low body temperature are classic symptoms of Hypothyroidism.

Few physicians are trained to detect this connection. Fortunately, hypothyroidism can be reversed when the underlying root problem (such as adrenal fatigue) is resolved. Those who have hypothyroidism but fail to improve with thyroid replacement medication should therefore always investigate adrenal fatigue as a possible etiology for their thyroid problem. Normalization of the adrenal function in such cases is the key and it often leads to spontaneous resolution of the hypothyroid symptoms.┬áThe faster the sufferer of adrenal fatigue recovers, the faster the symptoms of hypothyroidism will be resolved.┬áThis can happen in a matter of weeks. Those who are on thyroid replacement will invariably find that less medication is needed as their adrenal function normalizes. In fact, one can become overmedicated and thus run the risk of hyperthyroidism if one’s thyroid medication is not reduced as the adrenal fatigue condition improves. This is an important yardstick and gauge of improvement of one’s adrenal function. The credit goes to the adrenal glands and not the thyroid gland. As the adrenals improve, the need for down-regulation subsides and thyroid function suppression is lifted, leading to normalization of the thyroid function.

Hypothalamus and Pituitary dysfunction can also cause Hypothyroidism. The Hypothalamus sends a neurological message to the Pituitary and the Pituitary sends the message to the Thyroid. If brain function is compromised then Hypothyroidism can be present. Go to a L3W provider and see what organ and gland is reducing the production of Thyroid hormone.

Robert D. Stein D.C., ABAAHP

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